Response

The Walt Whitman Archive – McGonagill 2

By Evan McGonagill
January 2011

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2What are its weaknesses? What do you wish it would let you do? What changes would you suggest?

Evan McGonagill

BA in English, Class of 2010 – Bryn Mawr College

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1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 While I found the basic navigability of the site to be well-designed, I wish that it was easier to discover new things in the database. The obvious place to begin would be the search tool, which is very limited. While more robust features are promised for the future (according to a notice at the top of the page), the current tool falls short of expectations for a database of this size and quality. Discovery of new material depends upon the possibility of encountering random bits of data and the ability to arrange information in new permutations such that new synchronies arise; currently, the Archive is not well configured for such active contact between the reader and the raw data. In addition to random data, an improved search tool would also better allow the user to conduct specific paths of inquiry. For a hypothetical student with an assignment to follow, it can be important to view thematic cross sections rather than vertical stacks of data under folders.

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 The addition of tagging would help to increase the fluidity of the site. In order to maintain the rigor of its editorship, the Archive might prefer to use tags that are curated by a team rather than a ‘folksonomy’ approach that opens up tag authorship to all users and lets the system grow on its own, minimally governed. The functionality of the search tool might improve, also, by responding to terms that have demonstrated relevance to users rather than random syntax in content.

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 Navigation between pages on the Archive is smooth and intuitive; however, it could benefit form the implementation of same-page navigation tools. Many of the pages on the site feature very long texts, which require excessive scrolling and are difficult to read in a non-linear fashion. A hyperlinked table of contents at the top might be a first step, but many of the long critical articles do not have obvious breaking points and would not divide naturally into a table. Eventually, it would be good to see a more sophisticated tool for navigating through content on the same page—as it is, a database that deliberately embraces the fluidity of digital forms traps the reader in a format that is ironically dependent upon rigid sequence and imitated print forms. Reducing this rigidity would greatly improve the user experience.

Evan McGonagill

BA in English, Class of 2010 – Bryn Mawr College

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Source: https://www.archivejournal.net/roundtable/the-walt-whitman-archive-mcgonagill-2/?replytopara