Roundtable

Undergraduates in the Archives

By Hayes Smith
February 2012

In this issue, five contributors address how hands-on work with archives has been incorporated into undergraduate education. They each answer a series of five questions to report on what they have done, what has worked or not, and the value of bringing archives into the classroom–or the classroom into the archive. We invite you to read through the responses by author or by question.

  1. How have you worked with undergraduates in archives and/or special collections?

    Read the Responses
  2. What are the benefits of doing so, pedagogically and intellectually?

    Read the Responses
  3. What has been your best experience or greatest success?

    Read the Responses
  4. What are some of the challenges you have encountered?

    Read the Responses
  5. How do you integrate archival work, logistically and practically, into your curriculum?

    Read the Responses

Kevin Gotkin

BA in Media, Culture, and Communication, Class of 2011 – NYU
PhD Student, Annenberg School for Communication – University of Pennsylvania

  • Kevin's Responses:
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Benjamin Hebblethwaite

Assistant Professor, Department of Languages, Literature & Culture – University of Florida
PI, The Vodou Archive

  • Benjamin's Responses:
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Timothy B. Powell

Director, Native American Projects – American Philosophical Society
Senior Lecturer, Department of Religious Studies – University of Pennsylvania
Editor, Gibagadinamaagoom: An Ojibwe Digital Archive

  • Timothy B.'s Responses:
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Suzy Taraba

Head of Special Collections and University Archivist – Wesleyan University

  • Suzy's Responses:
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Sarah Werner

Undergraduate Program Director – Folger Shakespeare Library

  • Sarah's Responses:
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Source: http://www.archivejournal.net/roundtable/undergraduates-in-the-archives/